Above the rules

So not only have the Idaho State Police extended my stop and violated my civil rights; now comes the prosecutor making like he’s above the rules of the courts.

Not only was he supposed to put in his answer to the suppression motion by Sept. 30, but he acts like it did not really happen. He has put the answer in 22 days late. He acts like he is above the law and that the rules the judge handed down do not apply.

As the defendants, we have to follow the rules and have followed them at every part he has assigned.

So when have there been no rules when it comes to being an Idaho State Police officer or the Nez Perce County prosecutor?

JayDee

McArthur Sr.

Lewiston

Change or die

Marc C. Johnson’s recent commentary about the disappearing local newspapers (Oct. 15) hit a sore spot in our world today brought about by the internet.

Large-chain publishers are purchasing small local newspaper companies, then thinning out local staff. They also depreciate these new assets as a tax break. Sheltering income via depreciation has been a long practice under the U.S. Tax Code. In the 1980s, the Burlington Northern and Union Pacific railroads bought out the Camas Prairie Railroad, then depreciated the rolling stock assets for a few years to zero. The CPRR disappeared into oblivion. ...

The media written word is affected by the internet, and depreciating local publisher’s assets is just business. The U.S. Revenue Code allows larger companies to do this. It’s just business. Congress writes the revenue code, but big business drives Congress — business as usual.

The internet is also causing havoc in other businesses worldwide. Purchasing goods and products via the internet is devastating small businesses that market all products in small-populated towns nationwide and worldwide.

Lewiston alone has lost outlets such as J. C. Penney, Macys, Big K, Shopko and too many others to list. Purchasing goods and products by the internet is closing stores and shops worldwide. And the generational gap amplifies all this. Younger people are much more tech savvy than the older people. Generational differences are changing everything exponentially. Technical changes and internet changes are also changing exponentially.

When it comes to either business or the media, it’s change or die. ...

Robert A. Morton

Lewiston

Clueless about CRT

Do most people who are getting tied in knots about critical race theory have a clue what they are talking about?

Of course not.

Wikipedia defines it as follows: Critical race theory is a body of legal scholarship and an academic movement of United States civil rights scholars and activists who seek to examine the intersection of race and U.S. law and to challenge mainstream American liberal approaches to racial justice.

Very clearly, this is a high level of academic study that is very unlikely to be contained in K-12 curriculum.

Republicans regularly engage in raising issues that are inclined to perturb the unsophisticated. In particular, in this case, those who are narrow-minded and tend to be bigoted don’t know what critical race theory is. But they certainly don’t want their children exposed to it.

As with sex education, areas of study must be age appropriate. And to understand United States history, racial issues must be included. However, suitable inclusion of such issues in a K-12 setting does not happen at the level of critical race theory.

When your K-12 student’s studies include historical items related to race in this country, that is not critical race theory.

It is ridiculous that teaching of CRT in public schools is an election issue and that votes would be based upon fear of this topic.

Shirley Ringo

Moscow

Where’s the mayor?

Well, that didn’t take long. Lewiston chose a strong mayor system and in less than two days, our strong mayor elect chose to be the absent mayor.

But don’t worry; he is going to hire an assistant — you know a city manager or supervisor — to do the hard work. Our new mayor doesn’t plan on even showing up for work during the first three or four months, except when it’s convenient for him.

We are revamping our city leadership system during this time frame and the new mayor will be absent? Where does Lewiston fit into the mayor’s priorities? Is this the responsible and responsive leadership voters sought?

Gary Chase

Lewiston