Chasing the bottom line

As a 16-plus year past volunteer, I am responding to Jan. 26 letter regarding St. Joseph Regional Medical Center dropping (free) valet patient parking. Most people may not realize the valet crew did not just park cars. They helped with patients who needed help getting a wheelchair, getting into the emergency room and the admission department.

This will now be left for the departments to figure out how to have enough (extra) time to help all the people who need help for what the valet group did. ...

When they parked your car in the summer, they put up covers (if you had one) on your windshield to save your dash and put windows down to help with the heat. In the winter they got the snow off your car. The notion they did not meet SJRMC standards is pure nonsense.

After being purchased from a nonprofit to a for-profit hospital, things have certainly changed (patients can decide if this was for better service or not). ...

SJRMC has also closed the gift shop on Sunday. ...

Maybe Sundays were not as profitable as they would like, but what did they have to lose since it was staffed by volunteers? ...

Sounds like everything is coming down to the almighty dollar. SJRMC does have some really great doctors and nurses. I do not understand the logic of laying off and hiring right out of nursing school. After reading this letter, I wonder if any employee is wondering: Am I next?

Barb Robbins

Lewiston

Animals treated well

Animal rights activists are working hard to end studies at Washington State University and other research universities that benefit humans and animals alike. However, in doing so, their efforts have actually helped reveal the many layers of oversight that ensure research animals are well cared for.

As highlighted in the Lewiston Tribune’s reporting, rare and unforeseen incidents, such as those that occurred at WSU, are often self-reported by the university conducting the research. These required reports come in addition to unannounced inspections by U.S. Department of Agriculture-appointed animal care experts and the many other federal, state and institutional regulations, guidelines and protocols that dictate health research involving animals.

Groups such as Stop Animal Exploitation Now have a right to oppose research, even life-saving research that benefits all of us. However, they simply cannot ignore the tremendous amount of effort that goes into ensuring research animals are treated with kindness and respect.

Paula Clifford

Washington, D.C.

Get down to business

Sigh. I had another airport adventure to Pullman again last night to pick up my returning German granddaughter.

The roads were bare and dry. (Thanks, Washington state road department).

I waited one-and-a-half hours. The airplane made two attempts to land. Then it diverted back to Seattle. It couldn’t risk the lack of visibility.

Driving back home, the fog had settled on the road. When I reached the top of the hill, the valley was all bright and clear. A plane could easily have landed.

My granddaughter managed to find some friends of a friend who rescued her at SeaTac so she could get some sleep. (You don’t get a hotel voucher for weather.)

She flew in this morning and a friend of her mom brought her down. She was one tired puppy but better off for problem solving with her resources.

I sure wish the Lewiston airport board could get down to business and quit the arguing. I’m tired of making all these canceled trips to Pullman. This is the third time in six weeks.

Sharon Hoseley

Clarkston

Idaho alpacas

As interesting as the alpaca story in the Feb. 26 paper was, I was dismayed that the story had to come from Bay Springs, Miss., when there is a great alpaca ranch with a great story less than a hour north of here — Grazing Hills Alpaca Ranch, Country Store and B&B. They bought their first alpaca in 1993. They were the second family in Idaho to raise alpacas and have helped many families start their own herd.

We as a family have visited many times to enjoy these wonderful creatures and their big eyes and amazingly soft fur.

Tim Lynch

Lewiston

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