Hunting the witch

The Bozo in chief is calling the impeachment a “witch hunt,” which is probably the only true thing he has said during his entire life.

It is a witch hunt and he is the biggest, meanest, baddest, fattest, sleaziest, ugliest witch in the history of all witches.

Mr. Bozo is also upset because Time magazine named Greta Thunberg “Person of the Year” for 2019 and Mr. Tiny Hands was sure they were gonna name him instead.

But no worries, Mr. Witch, Time is reportedly gonna name you not only “Witch of the Year,” but something that rhymes with it but is more profane as well.

So keep on smiling, dialing and lying and all that other stuff you do so well while you are being undeniably, unsatisfiably, stoopifyingly all alibyingly impeachable you.

Doodah.

Marco Munez

Clarkston

Save the fish

I applaud Abel Workman’s Dec. 8 letter and his interest in examining “the fish problem.”

There is some truth in his assertion that the ocean is “over-fished” and there are “severe pollution problems. ...”

I wish Workman and every interested citizen could have heard the expert opinions expressed at the seminar on anadromous fish just last week, sponsored by the Idaho Guides and Outfitters Association and hosted by the Clearwater Casino. The experts agreed ocean conditions are a big problem, especially increased ocean acidity that had developed mostly in the last century. It will take an extended effort by the combined nations of the world to take effective action.

So what can we do right now?

The biggest salmon/steelhead mortality occurs not in the Pacific, but in the Columbia/Snake hydro system migration corridor. There is not enough stream velocity. Most fish do not “return” because they don’t make it to the ocean; they die en route.

Scientists at the conference showed clearly that fish with fewer reservoirs to navigate do much better than those enduring more slackwater(s). The notable example was the fish returns for the John Day River with four dam reservoirs versus the Salmon and Grand Ronde rivers with eight major dams. Four reservoirs are not as deadly as eight, and if we wait for an ocean fix, we will witness the further extinction of our precious gifts from God.

Urge our local and national leadership to recognize the science and lead or get out of the way.

Steven R. Evans

Lapwai

Remove the dams

We occasionally revisit the possibility of maybe thinking about occasionally revisiting the possibility of maybe thinking about what it might take to consider doing something with dams on our rivers that might be making it harder for wild salmon to spawn in their native waters.

“I’m an outfitter and, oh my, I don’t know what I’m going to do if we have many more years like this one.”

“I’m an elected leader and I think we should have more discussion with all affected parties about bringing possible options to the table.”

Here it is: Migrating salmon need unimpeded cold flowing water to successfully reach their natural spawning beds. Smolts need the same for their return.

Dams restrict the flow of water. Slow water becomes warmer. Without wild salmon, entire ecosystems fail. Personal gain at the expense of healthy supportive ecosystems is a road to ruin.

The four lower Snake River dams — Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and Ice Harbor — must be removed to allow migrating salmon reasonable access to traditional cold water, high elevation spawning grounds. People who are in denial, accompanied by those engaged in political foot-dragging, must get out of the way.

Reflect on that using your own research, thought and intuition. Lives depend on it.

Bruce Rankin

McCall