A seven-car crash on an Idaho state highway Saturday sent several people to the hospital and killed three, including a Kuna city official.

Lisa Holland, Kuna’s director of economic development, was killed in the Saturday crash, according to Kuna Mayor Joe Stear. Holland, a Meridian resident, also served as a member of Meridian’s planning and zoning commission, according to the city’s website.

She was 34.

“The people who work here at the city, we’re one large family, and it’s extremely painful when we lose someone in that manner,” Stear said during a phone interview. “Lisa will be deeply missed here, and we all loved her.”

Holland, an unnamed juvenile and 38-year-old Portland, Ore., resident Laurie Bloomquist died from injuries sustained in the crash, according to a news release from Idaho State Police.

All three were in the same vehicle. Police say Holland and Bloomquist died at the scene, while the juvenile was taken to St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center. The juvenile died Sunday.

Just after 4 p.m. Saturday, Idaho State Police were called to the multivehicle crash on Idaho 51 south of Mountain Home. One semitrailer truck, three pickups, two SUVs and a sedan were involved, according to ISP, but authorities don’t know what caused the pileup.

A 32-year-old man was driving the vehicle that contained Holland and the two others who died, police said. He was taken to St. Luke’s Elmore Medical Center in Mountain Home for treatment. Three people in other vehicles who were injured went to the same hospital.

ISP said all people involved in the crash were wearing seat belts.

The crash blocked both lanes of the highway for around four hours; it is still under investigation by ISP.

Stear said Monday that Holland started as Kuna’s economic development director around three years ago and is responsible for many projects.

“That’s one of those jobs that takes awhile to really have anything come to fruition and to see any real great progress, but it was obvious that she was doing a great job,” Stear said.

The Kuna mayor said Holland’s death leaves a big hole in the city’s administration. He called Holland a dreamer, and said he and others will now try to ensure that the projects she started get done.

He said city employees last worked with Holland on Friday.

“It’s just so important to make people know how much they’re valued and how quickly life can do whatever life does to you,” Stear said.